Higher Education

Turning university prestige into something students value

[[image|left|faculty=5038|caption=Dr. Matthew Hartley]]

Matthew Hartley, Executive Director of the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy (Penn AHEAD) and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Penn GSE, makes the case for innovation and value-added services at prestigious institutions of higher education.


 

 

 

Diagnosis: College costs pushed beyond families’ ability to pay

Policy choices by political and institutional leaders have made college less affordable in all 50 states, with real consequences for American families.

Diagnosis: College Costs Pushed Beyond Families’ Ability to Pay

Media Contact: 

Kat Stein, Penn GSE                                      
katstein@upenn.edu
 215-898-9642      
 

Joan Brasher, Vanderbilt
joan.brasher@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-6397

 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Policy choices by political and institutional leaders have made college less affordable in all 50 states, with real consequences for American families. A study published today by the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education (Penn GSE) ranks all 50 states on college affordability, and gives a sobering view of the difficulty many low- and middle-income families have paying for college even after financial aid is taken into account.

Report from Penn AHEAD illuminates college degree wealth gap

Although more U.S. students from all races, ethnicities, and economic levels have enrolled in colleges and universities after high school in the past 40 years, family income has a significant impact on entrance to college, student loan debt, and degree completion, according to a report issued by the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy at Penn GSE. The persistent inequality is associated in part, the report shows, with limited postsecondary options for students from families in the country’s lowest income group.

Over 40-plus Years, Poorest Students Receive Just 10 Percent of Bachelor’s Degrees

Media Contact: 

Beth Hogan
Council for Opportunity in Education
Beth.hogan@coenet.us
(978) 979-1886

Jeff Frantz
Penn GSE
frantzj@upenn.edu
(215) 898-3269

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 19, 2016) – Although more U.S. students from all races, ethnicities and economic levels have enrolled in colleges and universities after high school in the past 40 years, family income has a significant impact on entrance to college, student loan debt and degree completion, according to a report issued today. The persistent inequality is associated in part, the report shows, with less resourced post-secondary school choices for students from families in the country’s lowest income group.

Helping high school athletes make the right college choice

Newsroom Home Teaser: 
Shaun Harper on helping high school athletes choose a college
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Shaun Harper offers advice for high school athletes, their families, coaches, teachers, and advisors about picking the right college for them.

 

For high school athletes, an offer to play sports in college represents the fulfillment of a lifelong dream. But for the vast majority of college athletes who won’t be playing in the NFL or making an Olympic team, college can’t just be about sports.

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Black Male Student-Athletes Winners on the Field for NCAA Power 5 Schools, Losing Out on Graduation

Media Contact: 

Jeff Frantz, Penn GSE Associate Director of Communications

frantzj@upenn.edu | 215-898-3269

Black men fill the rosters of the biggest college football and basketball programs in the country. They are crucial to the 65 universities that make up the Power 5 athletic conferences and earn millions in ticket revenue, television rights, and merchandising. But what are these Black student-athletes getting in return?

Harper to debate state of free speech on US campuses

[[image|right|faculty=5040|caption=Dr. Shaun Harper]]

In the last year, protests have spread on campuses across the country against racial injustice, gender and sexual orientation discrimination, and sexual violence. Are these protestors spurring needed conversations, or are calls for trigger warnings in the classroom suppressing free speech?


 

 

 

Preparing students to make the right college choice

Faculty Member: 
Newsroom Home Teaser: 
Laura Perna on the college choice
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Laura Perna offers suggestions for preparing students, and their families, for college.

 

In our global, technologically driven economy, people increasingly need at least some postsecondary education to find a place in the workforce. At the same time, budget crises in school districts across the nation are forcing schools to reduce the number of counselors, shifting the burden of college advising to teachers and other school staff. This is happening even as research shows student background continues to be the best predictor of who will find a place in higher education.

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Ph.D. student Roman Ruiz receives prestigious K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award

Roman Ruiz, a second-year Ph.D. student in the Higher Education Division, is a 2016 recipient of the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award. The award recognizes graduate students who show exemplary promise as future leaders in higher education by placing a strong emphasis on teaching and learning.

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