Teaching & Leadership

Men must speak up when they hear language like Trump's, Shaun Harper says

In an op-ed for The Washington Post, Penn GSE’s Shaun Harper said Donald Trump’s comments about women should prompt a call to action for all men.

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“When men fail to challenge other men on troubling things they say about and do to women, we contribute to cultures that excuse sexual harassment, assault and other forms of gender violence,” Harper wrote.

Penn GSE grad leading an XQ Super School

Cristina Alvarez spent 15 years planning what would become Delaware Design-Lab High. She envisioned a place where students would be challenged to learn by solving real world problems in their own communities.

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We Should Have Zero Tolerance for Trump’s Debate Stage Bullying, Says Penn GSE Counseling Expert

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Jeff Frantz (215)-898-3269/frantzj@gse.upenn.edu

*Note for TV and radio: The University of Pennsylvania has an on-campus ISDN line and ready access to a satellite uplink facility with live-shot capability.

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Teaching civic engagement intentionally

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Sigal Ben-Porath and Rand Quinn offer practical ideas for teachers of any subject who are hoping to introduce their students to civic engagement in the classroom
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Penn GSE professors Sigal Ben-Porath and Rand Quinn offer practical ideas for teachers of any subject who are hoping to introduce their students to civic engagement in the classroom.

 

This election season, like so many before, candidates try to attract the support of youth and minorities, groups who historically have been less inclined to vote. While most schools offer or require a course on government and civics, intended to teach students the basic principles and practices of democracy, teachers often struggle to instill habits of civic engagement in their students. 

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New Ideas for a New School Year

That ringing bell means vacation is over and school is back.

The new year means a chance for teachers and administrators to explore new approaches in their schools and classrooms. Penn GSE’s Educator’s Playbook is full of ideas to try:

Mindfulness in the classroom

Mindfulness in the classroom

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Elizabeth Mackenzie offers tips for integrating contemplative practices into the classroom
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Elizabeth Mackenzie offers tips on how educators can improve their students' academic performance, as well as physical and mental health, by integrating contemplative practices into the classroom.

From kindergarten to high school classes to schools of law and medicine, educators are offering mindfulness as a strategy to enhance students’ academic performance and to support their physical and mental health. Mindfulness, an antidote to the wandering mind, is focused awareness in the present moment. The most common mindfulness practice is to focus on breathing while holding thoughts and sensations in nonjudgmental awareness.

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Teaching students to think like historians

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Abby Reisman on how students can develop critical thinking skills by reading history texts
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History class should not simply be a space where students learn through rote memorization. Abby Reisman offers tips on how educators should frame class sessions to develop students' critical thinking skills instead.

 

History class should be a space where students learn to think and reason, not just memorize. We want students to be able to answer not only “What happened?” but “How do you know?” and “Why do you believe your interpretation is valid?” Such questions align with the Common Core State Standards, which specify that college-ready students be able identify an author’s perspective, develop claims, and cite evidence to support their analyses.
 

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Reimagining leadership in your school

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John DeFlaminis on how distributed leadership might work in schools
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John DeFlaminis developed a Distributed Leadership Program that creates leadership teams that leverage how influence actually works in schools, and channels that reality to transform schools.

 

Who actually leads in a school? Traditionally, the answer has been the people with titles and offices. Principals and superintendents do wield formal power, but research tells us that many people actually influence the core work of successful schools.

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Grossman: ‘Disruption’ in education—without research—can be a recipe for disaster

[[image|left|faculty=5049|caption=Dean Pam Grossman]]In an op-ed for the Washington Post, Penn GSE Dean Pam Grossman argues children are losing out in the rush to improve schools with radical, and often unproven, “disruption.” 

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